Jun 162015
 

Addendum: The Senate Appropriations Committee's Interior and Environment Subcommittee followed suit by approving its own spending bill, which also prohibits spending to implement the WOTUS rule.

June 16 - The House Appropriations Committee approved a spending bill for the Interior Department and EPA that includes riders targeting the possible proposed listing of the greater sage-grouse, directing that the gray wolf in Wyoming and the Great Lakes be delisted once again, and prohibiting EPA from implementing its newly promulgated "waters of the U.S." rule.

The committee rejected amendments to strip the bill of those riders and others that have been criticized by the Obama Administration and environmental groups, including one addressing the listing of the northern long-eared bat. In addition, the committee adopted an amendment directing FWS to complete a five-year review of the Delta smelt.

Here's a list of amendments that did pass the committee, as provided in a press release issued today:

Rep. Calvert – The Manager’s amendment makes technical and non-controversial changes to the bill and report. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Visclosky –The amendment changes bill language requiring that all iron and steel used in water infrastructure projects be sourced within the United States. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Amodei – The amendment adds report language clarifying the process for products to be designated as “made in America.” The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Jenkins – The amendment prohibits funding for the EPA to implement or administer updates to existing ozone regulations. The amendment was adopted on a vote of 31-20.

Rep. Cole – The amendment prohibits funding to implement, administer, or enforce a final rule titled "Hydraulic Fracturing on Federal and Indian Lands." The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.

Rep. Valadao – The amendment adds report language relating to the Delta Smelt and directs the Fish and Wildlife Service to complete a five-year status review of the species, as required by law. The amendment was adopted on a voice vote.